Classic movie review: Point Blank 1967

Lee Marvin is the quintessential Hollywood tough guy. His turn in the role as Walker continues his trend as a man betrayed shot and left for dead in a heist film starring he, John Vernon in his first Hollywood role as Mal Reese and Angie Dickenson as Walker’s sister-in-law Chris. The beginning of the film sets Reese and Walker as heistmen seeking to rob a courier for a major gambling  operation on Alcatraz Island as the drop point. Reese betrays Walker and shoots him and leaves him for dead on Alcatraz Island. Walker lives and makes his way off the island and recovers only to discover the Reese has also made off with his wife Lynne. Walker tracks down his estranged wife in his pursuit of Reese only to not find him there. Walker continues his search for Reese who has used his cut of $93,000 to pay off a debt to a crime syndicate.With the help of his sister-in-law Chris, he continues his search for Reese making his way through all his contacts in the underworld hoping to take his revenge and get his money back.

The role of Walker is easy for Marvin as he is known for such hard nosed protagonists of old Hollywood films. He is part of the class of movie tough guys among which include Clint Eastwood, Charles Bronson, Telly Savalas, Ernest Borgninem Jim Brown and Chuck Conners. For Point Blank, Marvin is largely responsible for the film’s production in the selection and deferment of all principal casting decisions to John Boorman, a friend with whom he built the movie and the character or Walker around. Marvin met Boorman while on the set of The Dirty Dozen in London and worked out the details of Point Blank tossing out a script for the movie The Hunter but keeping the character of Walker setting him as the protagonist in Point Blank. As classic movies go this rates right up there among one of Lee Marvin’s best. On the 10 scale it earns a 7.  Be sure to check this out on Netflix for sure.

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